Fear

Risto Pakarinen

Hypengyophobia [from the Greek “hypengyos”, meaning responsible and “phobos”, meaning fear] is an overwhelming, irrational fear of responsibility. A hypengyophobic person might be self-indulgent, irresponsible, even at the expense of others, and tend to blame others when their own irresponsibility results in failure.

Risto Pakarinen

Atychiphobia (from the Greek phóbos, meaning “fear” or “morbid fear,” and atyches meaning “unfortunate”) is the abnormal, unwarranted and persistent fear of failure.

Risto Pakarinen

Gymnophobia (from Greek γυμνός - gumnos, “naked” and φόβος - phobos, “fear”) is a fear of nudity. Gymnophobics experience anxiety from nudity. Their fear may stem from a general anxiety about sexuality, a fear of physical inferiority, or fear that their nakedness leaves them exposed and unprotected.

Risto Pakarinen

“Tachophobia is the condition of having an abnormal, extreme, and persistent fear of speed, that is, the experience of traveling quickly.”

Risto Pakarinen

“Social anxiety is the fear of interacting with other people, which can bring on intense feelings of self-consciousness. Put another way, social anxiety is the fear of being judged negatively by other people, leading to feelings of inadequacy, embarrassment, humiliation and depression.”

Risto Pakarinen

Hodophobia. Most people’s fear of traveling is associated with a fear of flying, while some suffer from a fear of trains or a fear of driving in cars. Some are afraid of strange places, closed spaces or the inevitable contact with strangers.

Risto Pakarinen

Fear is a survival mechanism. Fear keeps us alert, on our toes. And it’s primal. According to neuroscientific research, the neural circuitry underlying fear is highly conserved in mammalian species, from rats to humans. In other words, fear mechanisms and systems are so fundamental that they’ve been carried over through the biggest of changes, the many, many slow changes that have made us, us: evolution.

Risto Pakarinen

“Cainophobia or Cainotophobia, Cenophobia or Centophobia, Kainolophobia or Kainophobia, or Neophobia is defined as the persistent and abnormal fear of anything new; things, ideas or situations, of novelty. In its milder form, it can manifest as the unwillingness to try new things or break from routine.”

Risto Pakarinen

“Agoraphobia is a condition where the sufferer becomes anxious in environments that are unfamiliar or where he or she perceives that they have little control. Triggers for this anxiety may include open spaces, crowds (social anxiety), or traveling (even short distances). Agoraphobia is often, but not always, compounded by a fear of social embarrassment, as the agoraphobic fears the onset of a panic attack and appearing distraught in public.”

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